Monday, September 12, 2016

The Music of My Children

I’m not a very good dancer. I never really learned how to dance and I’m a little uncomfortable dancing when other people are around.

I also can’t sing. My mean, terrible, horrible sister told me I had a lousy voice when we were little and I just stopped singing all together. I love my sister and she’s not really mean, terrible or horrible, but she’s my sister so also she is.

I can’t play any musical instruments. I wanted to be good at playing an instrument and in elementary school, I played the flute for two years, but I really wanted to play the drums. After those two years I lost interest in playing an instrument and never went back to try anything else.

I REALLY, REALLY, REALLY hope my kids dance in public like there is no one around, sing loud & proud and find an instrument that they love and feel in their heart.

The benefits for children of dancing, singing, playing and listening to music are profound.


Dancing helps toddlers develop their gross motor skills, practice self-expression, gain coordination, interact socially with others and much more. Dancing is great exercise and not to mention a lot of fun.

In her article for the British Council (britishcounsil.org), Lin Marsh explains that Singing is an aerobic exercise that improves the efficiency of the cardio-vascular system increasing the oxygenation of the blood. Signing can help with stress reduction, longevity and improved general health. Additionally, when you belt out a song, it increases airflow in the upper respiratory tract impeding bacteria that can cause colds and flu.

Reading music and playing an Instrument is a relative of mathematics and will help a child develop creative expression. But before they can read and express musical notes, using simple drums, bells and shakers are a fun and interactive way to introduce a child to musical instruments and allow them to be part of a song.

Music in general contributes to all areas of child development. Music stimulates cognitive, social, emotional, physical and language development. Music and song will broaden a child’s vocabulary as they are exposed to words they sing and want to repeat and remember. Additionally, Mary Gavin MD at kidshealth.org explains that music exposes developing children to what experts call “a rich sensory environment”. This means exposing them to a wide variety of tastes, smells, sounds, colors, shapes and more. These experiences create more pathways between neural connections and will help kids in almost every area of school.

When considering a music class or program for your child make sure the class is interactive, fun and includes age appropriate instruments for your child. Additionally a class around 45 minutes long is generally what works best for children through toddler age.

With our own kids, we started them in music classes when they were 6 months old. I’ll never forget the joy I experienced as I watched them smile, laugh and move their little bodies to the music. At home, we make a point to turn up the radio and jump around and have a dance party. In both the music classes and at home I deliberately dance, sing and let my kids see me enjoying myself.

Thanks to this experience and to my kids, I’m not so uncomfortable anymore…even though I still can’t dance and my sister still says I’m a terrible singer!

Music Classes at A Mother’s Haven!

In our Baby & Toddler Music Classes at A Mother's Haven we incorporate music, movement, dance and play to help your child’s communication, social and physical development. Our classes are 45 minutes long and include age appropriate musical instruments, movement and sound to introduce your child to music in a fun interactive way. We have baby and Toddler music classes in English, Spanish and French! We can’t wait to see you and your little one!

Visit our class pages at shopthehaven.com for more information!

Visit us at:
16101 Ventura Blvd. Suite 230
Encino, CA. 91436
p. (818) 380-3111 w. shopthehaven.com